Korea’s Low Birth Rate

The birth rate in Korea is incredibly low. According to the CIA World Factbook, South Korea ranks 219th out of 224 sovereign countries with a staggering 8.33 births per 1000 people. Niger ranks first with 46.84, the US 147th with 13.66 and Monoco last with 6.79 per 1000 people. 
Source the Korea Herald.
I hadn’t thought much about the repercussions of low birth rates, but it can create a shaky foundation for some parts of the economy. For example, universities, like mine, are scrambling on how to deal with a much smaller pool of students in the next 5-10 years. Many smaller universities are expected to shut down or suffer from a sharp decline in the number of students. 
One cause for the low birth rate seems to be that Korean society continues to put traditional pressure on their women to be mothers and wives first. But Korean women today are beginning to think beyond Confucian ideals and think differently about their future. Being married and having children in Korea’s traditional family structure makes a future in the work force near impossible. 
Not only has the birth rate declined, but, according to a government survey, less than half of Korean women between 9 and 24 feel that they need to get married. And why would they? In today’s world, what is attractive about being denied at least the option of working outside of the house? Or what looks interesting about being subservient to your husband and his family?

One thing is clear, there should be more Korean women in the workplace. They have been among the best doctors, professors and government workers I’ve encountered. They are smart, kind and work hard. You can even see it in the old women who are permanently hunched over from a lifetime of work in the rice fields. This country was built and continues to thrive on the hard work and intelligence of its women.

To help with the birthrate, the Korean government gives expecting mothers 500,000 won to help cover any hospital bills. This is indeed a nice gesture. But if the country really wants to increase its birthrate and stay proficient in the workplace, they need to find a way to change their idea of motherhood. Throwing money at the problem isn’t going to work. Korea is a country caught dead in the middle between tradition and change and for the sake of its population it needs to continue to evolve with its 21st century woman.